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Safari Cuisine

February 17th 2016  |  Botswana, Kenya, Namibia, Seychelles, Zambia  |  by  Richard Smith
Safari Cuisine

Africa is not generally considered a foodie holiday destination, not even on safari. However this is not true for those of us in the know. Not only is Africa home to a mouth watering culinary offering inspired by its rich cultural heritage but boasts some of the most spectacular settings on earth for you to enjoy breakfast, lunch and supper.

Bush breakfast

Breakfast cooked in the bush, away from camp, is a fantastic way to have a pit stop or to end a morning wildlife drive. Despite the lack of a permanent kitchen, and maybe even cooked over an open fire, a typical breakfast will nonetheless be substantial to set you up for the day. These elaborate affairs might include cereals, yoghurt, fruit, juice, eggs, bacon, toast, fried tomatoes and tea & coffee.

On a mobile safari every breakfast is a bush breakfast and chefs are used to minimal equipment, but can still conjure up treats like freshly baked bread.

A hearty bush breakfast, Sosian, Laikipia, Kenya

A hearty bush breakfast, Sosian, Laikipia, Kenya

Snacks for morning break and afternoon break

Long wildlife drives seeking out elusive animals, or waiting and watching by a waterhole, can lead to a thirst and perhaps even rumbling stomachs. Luckily guides will have generally packed teas and coffees for the morning stop and some beers and G&Ts for the ‘sundowners’ to enjoy at a pretty spot around sunset. Chefs will have normally included some yummy snacks as well to soak up the drinks.

Appetisers before supper - usually served with sundowners, Offbeat Mara, Masai Mara, Kenya

Appetisers before supper – usually served with sundowners, Offbeat Mara, Masai Mara, Kenya

Tasty snacks en route on safari, Toka Leya, Livingstone, Zambia

Tasty snacks en route on safari, Toka Leya, Livingstone, Zambia

Lunch

Back at camp you can relax for a couple of hours before lunch – usually the lightest meal of the day with fresh bread, salads, meats, cheeses and dips.

Lunch with fresh fruit and salad, Vumbura Plains Camp,

Lunch with fresh fruit and salad, Vumbura Plains Camp, Okavango, Botswana

Light lunch served in the tropics, North Island, Seychelles

Light lunch served in the tropics, North Island, Seychelles

Three Course Supper

Returning to camp, you might change before dinner – though safaris are a pretty casual affair. Depending on the country and camp, you’ll either dine individually (South Africa safaris especially and everywhere at the beach), or shared dinner-party style meals with your fellow guests hosted by the camp managers (most other safari areas).

Taking advantage of Africa’s dry weather most suppers are taken alfresco under star-strewn skies with mouth-watering dishes such as “crisp bass with porcini mushrooms and oxtail crust on wilted greens with red wine mushroom sauce”.

Braai

Africa is famous for its BBQs (or braai to the South Africans) and there’s a good chance that you’ll encounter one either on safari or during your stay on the beach. Unlike the typical British version there’ll be no sign of single use charcoal filled foil trays and badly cooked sausages!

Sesame Tuna and stir fry vegetables at Saruni Ocean, Kenya

Sesame Tuna and stir fry vegetables at Saruni Ocean, Kenya

BBQ meats and vegetables, North Island, Seychelles

BBQ meats and vegetables, North Island, Seychelles

Mains are followed by desert, usually with a fresh fruit option.

Strawberry desert at Serra Cafema, Kaokoland, Namibia

Strawberry desert at Serra Cafema, Kaokoland, Namibia

Desert by the pool at Saruni Ocean, Kenya

Desert by the pool at Saruni Ocean, Kenya

Panacotta, at Shumba, Kafue, Zambia

Panacotta, at Shumba, Kafue, Zambia

African seafood

The Indian Ocean laps at Africa’s balmly eastern seaboard, which is home to gorgeous archipelagos, islands and atolls. This coastline offers sun-drenched days, star-lit seafood feasts along with a choice of desert island picnics, and romantic, toes-in-the-sand dinners. With the natural abundance of seafood, you may be forgiven for thinking there won’t be much apart from fish dishes on your plate, but the Indian Ocean islands and coastlines are famous for fusion cuisine from aromatic French-Creole in Mauritius and the Seychelles, to Mozambique’s Portuguese-inspired peri-peri chicken and delicious vegetarian curries.

Prawns and lobster served at the North Island, Seychelles

Prawns and lobster served at the North Island, Seychelles

Any Questions?

Let us know in the comments of you’ve read this far and not found an answer you were looking for, or this blog has prompted a question. We travel widely in Africa and have years of experience stored on the far reaches of our heads. If we don’t know, we will know who to ask. We can let you know the answer and update the article.

What Next?

If these safari cuisine photos have inspired you to visit Africa do give us a call or email us. Our African experts can take your ideas and help plan a holiday to make the most of all that Africa has to offer.

One response to “Safari Cuisine”

  1. […] not a problem on safari. Food is so much better than most people expect and I wrote a blog on Safari Cuisine. In fact the biggest problem for most is coming home having gained a significant amount […]

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